Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 and 1: How to Prevent Diabetes & Its Complications

More Americans are developing diabetes type 2 and type 1.

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 and 1: How to Prevent Diabetes and Its Complications

Having pre-diabetes raises your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems. So, delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health.

According to the American Diabetes Society, 34.2 million Americans have diabetes in 2018 (or 10.5% of the population). Nearly 1.6 million Americans have type 1 diabetes, including about 187,000 children and adolescents.

Of the 34.2 million diabetic adults, 7.3 million are undiagnosed and do not know they have the disease — 1.5 million Americans are diagnosed with diabetes every year.

The prevalence of diabetes in seniors (Americans age 65 and older) remains high, at 26.8%, or 14.3 million seniors (diagnosed and undiagnosed).

What Is Prediabetes?

Prediabetes is when your blood glucose (also called blood sugar) levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be called diabetes. Other names for prediabetes include impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. Some people call prediabetes “borderline diabetes.”

In 2015, 88 million Americans age 18 and older had prediabetes. It’s really common, but more than 80% of people don’t know they have it. You won’t know if you have prediabetes unless you are tested.

Having prediabetes raises your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, heart disease and stroke. Many of the same factors that raise your chance of developing type 2 diabetes put you at risk for prediabetes.

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According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), prediabetes is reversible. If you’re pre-diabetic, you can delay or even prevent type 2 diabetes from developing by changing to a healthier lifestyle.

The longer you’re diabetic, the more likely you are to develop health problems. So, delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health.

What Is Diabetes Mellitus: Type 2 and Type 1?

People with diabetes mellitus type 1 and type 2 have high blood sugar levels.

Carbohydrates, such as fruits and vegetables, as well as other food we eat are turned into sugar or glucose that our bodies use for energy. The pancreas makes insulin hormone to help glucose get into the cells of our bodies.

When you’re diabetic, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or the insulin it makes doesn’t work as well as it should or both. This causes your blood sugar to build up.

Out-of-control blood sugar due to diabetes can cause serious health complications, including heart disease, blindness, kidney failure, nerve damage and lower-extremity amputations.

Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to pregnancy complications — birth defects are more common in babies born to diabetic women.

Diabetics have a higher risk of having a heart attack and stroke. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. It is the main cause of kidney failure, lower-limb amputations and adult blindness.

Type 2 diabetes accounts for up to 95 percent of all diabetes cases. It becomes more common with increasing age.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than doubled in the last 30 years due to the surge in obesity.

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Diabetes Mellitus Type 2 and Type 1: How to Prevent Diabetes and Its Complications

According to the American Diabetes Society, 34.2 million Americans have diabetes in 2018 (or 10.5% of the population). By managing your diabetes effectively, you can avoid pain and suffering from diabetic complications as well as premature death.

How Do You Prevent or Delay Diabetes Mellitus Type 2?

A landmark trial by the Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) conducted at 25 centers nationwide, showed that lifestyle changes or Metformin can effectively delay diabetes (in the short term and long term compared to placebo) in a diverse population of overweight or obese American adults at high risk of diabetes.

Here are some things you can change to lower your risk of developing diabetes mellitus type 2:

  • Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5-7% of your starting weight. For example, the goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds.
  • Be physically active most days of the week. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. Talk with your health care professional about which activities are best if yo have not been active. Start slowly to build up to your goal.
  • Eat healthy foods and follow a reduced-calorie eating plan.

Ask your health care professional if you should take the diabetes drug, Metformin, and other changes you can make to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.

How Do You Avoid Diabetic Complications and Premature Death Due to Diabetes?

Diet, insulin and oral medication are used to lower blood glucose levels and help diabetics lead normal lives. Many diabetics also need to take medications to control their cholesterol and lower their high blood pressure.

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*  People with type 1 diabetes need insulin injections or delivered by pump to control their blood sugar and survive. Type 1 diabetes was previously called insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) or juvenile-onset diabetes.

*  People with diabetes mellitus type 2 can usually control their blood sugar by following a healthy diet and exercise program as well as losing excess weight and taking oral medication. Some people with type 2 diabetes may also need insulin to control their blood sugar.

Diabetes mellitus type 2 diabetes was previously called non–insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or adult-onset diabetes.

The most effective way to prevent diabetic complications is by regular blood sugar monitoring and good blood sugar control through healthy eating, exercise and medication.

By managing your diabetes effectively, you can avoid pain and suffering from diabetic complications as well as premature death.

 

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